Job Seeker2020-04-06T12:56:20+00:00

comeandstay for job seekers

Check what you need to do to prepare your move, the urgent steps to take in the first week, what can wait for the first month and finally how to get settled in the Netherlands.

Get active2019-07-13T15:37:36+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands for a while you might want to get back into your sports routine or meet some new people at the local gym. Most cities in the Netherlands offer a wide range of sports activities. If you live in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague or Utrecht a good opportunity to explore different studios and sports is OneFit or Classpass abonnement. Both allow you to exercise in a lot of different places with just one subscription. Depending on the city you live in, you pay between €49 and €59 per month. Watch out for promotional deals where you get a discount on your first month. You can quit or pause your abonnement every month.

GOOD TO KNOW: in the Netherlands a membership to the gym usually cost between €20 and €40 a month.

Like in any other country, there are a lot of different team sports in the Netherlands. Amongst students field hockey is quite popular. However, other common sports like soccer, volleyball, tennis, horse riding etc. are popular as well. You might want to google these to find a club nearby.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Celebrate King’s day2019-07-13T15:40:56+00:00

One thing you should not miss if you live in the Netherlands is King’s day. On 27th of April, the Dutchies celebrate the birthday of their King Willem Alexander. There are multiple activities on King’s night and day. You heard right, one day of a party would not be enough for the party-friendly Dutchies, so they start celebrating the night before. On King’ s night, in most cities, simply go to the city centre, and you’ll find enough to see and do. Especially in vivid cities like Amsterdam, Utrecht, Eindhoven and Nijmegen, there are stages and stands throughout the whole town. Also, watch out for the flea market. On King’s night and King’s day, citizens are allowed to sell things on the street, and that’s just what people do. In most cities, the flea market is restricted to certain areas.

The most important thing to remember on King’s day is to wear something orange or dress up in the Dutch colours red, blue and white. Even though it might feel silly at home, as soon as you approach the city centre, you will feel left out if you don’t. On King’s night and day, there are multiple open stages and things to do on the street. Pack some beers, and off you go. If you prefer it a bit less casual, there are numerous festivals for King’s day as well.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Visit festivals2019-07-13T15:42:20+00:00

The Dutchies love their (music) festivals, and they do like a good party. The biggest celebration day is the king’s day, which is the national celebration day and is celebrated with a lot of open stages and music throughout the whole country. Another nice country-wide festival you should not miss when living in the Netherlands is Bevrijdingsfestival on 5 May. On this day the Dutchies celebrate freedom and democracy in memory of the liberation from the Nazis in 1945 with free festivals throughout the country. And don’t miss gay pride in Amsterdam, one of the biggest gay events in the world and it’s canal parade with thousands of boats on the canals.

There are also many music festivals which last for several days. Check f.e. Lowlands, Best Kept Secret Festival, Pinkpop, Down The Rabbit Hole, We are Electric, Into The Great Wide Open, Into The Woods, Wildeburg and many more and make sure you buy your tickets early because most festivals in the Netherlands do sell out (fast).

A more local festival is ADE in Amsterdam. The Amsterdam Dance Event is one of the biggest festivals for electronic music. In addition to ADE, there are many one-day festivals for electronic music in the Netherlands. Check for example DGTL in Amsterdam, Free your mind in Arnhem, Soenda in Utrecht and many more.

If you live in Nijmegen, you won’t and shouldn’t miss 4daagse, which is a four-day march accompanied by festivity throughout the whole city. As stated earlier: the Dutchies love their festivals. Even though the actual march lasts for “only” four days, the festivity around lasts for ten days straight. So even if you don’t live in Nijmegen, don’t miss Nijmegse 4daagse!

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Get a Dutch driver’s licence2019-07-13T15:44:26+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands, you can continue to use your foreign driver’s licence for a certain period after arrival. The length of this period depends on the country where you obtained your driver’s licence. If your driver’s licence was issued in a European country before you registered in the Netherlands, you are allowed to use your driving licence for another 15 years after registering in the Netherlands. Check the website of the RDW (Dienst Wegverkeer) for more information regarding the length of the period.

However, if you plan to stay in the Netherlands for a more extended period, it might be beneficial to exchange your foreign driver’s licence to a Dutch one. E.g. in case of loss, it is much easier to apply for a new drivers licence if you already have registered your licence at your municipality. Check the website of the RDW for more information about how to exchange a foreign drivers licence when living in the Netherlands.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

National holidays in the Netherlands2019-07-13T15:46:06+00:00

If you work in the Netherlands, you might want to know the days you are officially off. In comparison to other European countries, the Dutch don’t have that many National holidays. The National Holidays in the Netherlands are:

  • New Year’s Day (1st January)
  • Easter Day & Easter Monday
  • King’s day (27th April)
  • Ascension day
  • Whit Sunday & Monday
  • Christmas Day & Second Day of Christmas (25th and 26th December)
If you work as an employee at a company in the Netherlands these days are official days off.
Furthermore, there is
  • Liberation Day (5th May)

which in most companies is a (paid) day off every 5 years. The next time is in 2020.

In most cities, most supermarkets are open on Sundays throughout the whole year. However, on some national holidays, the supermarkets are closed (f.e. Christmas and New Year’s Day) or have shorter openings hours (f.e. Easter and Pentecost). Please be aware that supermarkets might have different opening hours in smaller cities and villages.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Explore the Netherlands (and Europe)2019-12-23T16:29:16+00:00

Living in the Netherlands, you might not want to stay in your city as there is a lot to explore in the Netherlands. Make sure you’ll purchase a public transport card. It allows you to travel with all public transport within the Netherlands. Also regularly check Hema, Albert Heijn and even Kruidvat as they sometimes offer day tickets for the Dutch railway company at a discount rate.

However, not only the Netherlands has a lot to offer. City tripping in Europe is quite easy, and there are multiple options to get cheap travel deals. The Dutch Railway regularly offers pretty good deals for city trips all over Europe. However, you don’t have to travel far. Hollands neighbouring country Germany is more than eight times the size of the Netherlands and easily accessible per train. Like NS Internationaal the German railway company Deutsche Bahn offers pretty cheap saver fares worth checking not only for travelling within Germany but within the whole of Europe. Another great opportunity to travel within Europe is an interrail pass. With the Global Pass starting from €200 up to €500 you can travel a certain amount of days in a month within the whole of Europe. Also, Holland’s smaller neighbour Belgium has a lot to offer. Within two and a half hours you drive from Amsterdam to Antwerpen, and within three hours you’re in Brussels, Gent or the picturesque Bruges. Check booking.com for a nice accommodation.

If you are planning on travelling by plane, use Skyscanner or Google Flights to find the cheapest rates.

Change to Dutch app store without a credit card2019-11-10T20:12:41+00:00

If you own an iPhone, you probably didn’t change the app store from your country of origin to the Dutch one after moving to the Netherlands. However, you may have noticed that some of the Dutch apps like buienradar (and to be honest, this one is pretty essential if you live in the Netherlands) and Tikkie (also essential!) are only available in the Dutch app store. To change the app store, you need to provide a Dutch payment method which you might not have (yet). In this case, buy an iTunes top-up card in the supermarket and use this as a payment method when changing the Country of your app store.

The same applies to Android phones. You won’t be able to download Tikkie or buienradar on an Android phone if your Gmail account is assigned to another country. If you don’t want to switch the country of your current Gmail account an alternative is to create a second Gmail account and register your phone anew.

Are you curious which apps you must not miss on your phone when living in the Netherlands?

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Apply for a DigiD2019-07-13T15:59:14+00:00

Besides your BSN, the DigiD is one of the essential things you need when living in the Netherlands. The DigiD is your digital identity for the Dutch Government. It allows you to log in to websites from the Dutch government and healthcare. You will need a DigiD for filling in your tax declaration, applying for allowances, checking your registration at the municipality, etc. The DigiD consists of a username and a password. Additionally, you can apply for two-factor-authentication via SMS.

Apply for a DigiD here. Unfortunately, the link is only available in Dutch.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Take out Dutch health insurance2019-12-23T12:10:39+00:00

Health insurance is mandatory for all people working in the Netherlands or living in the Netherlands for more than four months. If you work in the Netherlands, you have to take out Dutch health insurance even if you are an EU citizen and possess an EU Health insurance card or if you have private health care insurance from your country of origin. You can choose health insurance yourself, and you will be invoiced directly. Compare different health insurances on Zorgkiezer, Independer or Zorgwijzer.

Please be aware that you need to be registered in the Netherlands and possess a BSN to get Dutch Health insurance. However, you’ll have four months leeway to arrange health insurance after your arrival.

There are about 50 health insurances in the Netherlands, but only eight of them offer an English website. ONVZ offers health insurance specifically for expats living in the Netherlands. Other health insurances with English websites are Zilveren KruisVGZ, CZ, MenzisAnderzorg and HollandZorg.

Which health costs are covered depends on the coverage of your insurance and the module(s) you choose. It is usually possible to choose between basic health insurance (which is mandatory) and additional modules which cover special care like glasses or physiotherapy. Most health insurance plans in the Netherlands also offer an extra module for dental care.

You should also be aware of mandatory excess – the yearly amount you participate yourself to your health expenses – which slightly changes every year. For 2019 the excess is €385. If you visit a doctor, you won’t be charged directly. Your health insurance will be charged and charge you for your mandatory excess and/or own contribution if applicable. A visit at the GP does not count for your mandatory excess.

Read more about health insurance in the Netherlands on the website of the Dutch government.

TIP: Depending on how high your income is, you might be entitled to receive healthcare allowance (zorgtoeslag).

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Register with a GP2019-07-13T16:11:20+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands, you usually register at a GP close to your house. On kiesuwhuisarts.nl you can type in your city or postal code and see all the GPs in your area. However, sometimes, medical practices can’t accept more clients. This is why it is wise to register with a doctor when you start settling in the Netherlands or at least before you actually get ill. Usually, you set up an intake appointment to talk through your medical history.

A visit at the GP is always covered by your Dutch health insurance and doesn’t count for your excess. If you need to see a specialist, you usually see your GP first. He/she then refers you to the appropriate specialist. For physiotherapy, you don’t need to see your GP first. However, most of the time, physiotherapy is not covered in the basic insurance module. Get more information about Dutch health insurance.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Medicine and pharmacies2019-07-13T16:12:55+00:00

In the Netherlands, you register at your local pharmacy (apotheek) and get all your medicine there. This way, the pharmacy is always aware of the medicine you take and makes sure you don’t get conflicting medication. Of course, it is possible to pick up medication at another pharmacy if e.g. you are in another part of the country and need the medication urgently. Make sure you can provide your health insurance and contact details.

If you get a prescription from your GP or doctor, it is usually sent automatically to your pharmacy. All you need to do is pick up the medicine at your pharmacy when it’s ready.

If you regularly take medicine and have a repeat prescription from your county of origin, it might be worth considering registering this prescription at the pharmacy after moving to the Netherlands. The easiest way to do this is to register with a GP (huisarts) and get a prescription for the Netherlands.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Get a Dutch phone number2019-10-21T13:03:09+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands for a more extended period, you might want to get a Dutch phone number. There are multiple phone providers in the Netherlands where you can usually choose from a prepaid card or a paid contract. If you frequently call abroad, it might be worthwhile to pick a contract. You can either go for a Sim Only contract (if you already have a mobile device where you can put in your new sim card) or decide to sign a contract where you’ll receive a phone. Usually, the second option is more expensive, because you will pay off your mobile phone monthly.

Check out Dutch phone provider
Register at the Embassy or consulate2019-07-13T16:16:43+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands for a more extended period, it may be useful to register at the embassy or consulate of your country of origin in the Netherlands. For most countries, this is voluntary, except for Swiss nationals, the registration is mandatory. It may bring various benefits if you permanently live in the Netherlands. For example, it makes it easier to apply for a new passport, register marriage or birth etc. It also gives you easier access to assistance in case of emergency.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Common insurances in the Netherlands2019-07-13T16:24:49+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands for a longer period, you might want to take out some insurance. Here are the most common insurances for people living in the Netherlands:

  • Home Contents Insurance (Inboedelverzekering) covers you for loss or damage to your movable property in your home f.e. through fire or theft.
  • Liability insurance (Aansprakelijkheidsverzekering) protects you from the risks of liability and covers you for involuntary (material) damage you cause on other peoples belongings or injure someone by your fault. This insurance costs +/-€4 a month.
  • Travel insurance (Reis- en annuleringsverzekering) can come in quite handy if you travel frequently. It covers unexpected expenses due to an accident or emergency as well as loss or theft of your luggage. Most insurance providers offer the option for cancellation insurance (annuleringsverzekering) which covers you for expenses due to unexpected cancellations of/on your trip.

GOOD TO KNOW: In the Netherlands, many banks offer insurance in addition to their financial products. It might be worthwhile checking with your bank if you are looking for insurance.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

What’s hot and happening?2019-07-13T16:26:14+00:00

Moving to a foreign country gives you the opportunity to explore a different (and rich) cultural life. Living in the Netherlands is no exception. Here are some websites to find out what’s hot and happening in your city. Some websites are only available in Dutch though.

If you like festivals, don’t forget to check out festivalinfo.nl regularly. Festivals are very popular in the Netherlands, and especially in the summer, every weekend there is something to do.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Post and mail2019-07-13T16:30:43+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands, you might want to post some Dutch greetings to your family and friends back home eventually. You might search for a post office in vain since most post offices in the Netherlands are reduced to a counter in a supermarket or tobacco shop. So it’s best to check the website of post.nl first to find the closest post.nl spot in your neighbourhood.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Where to get food?2019-12-06T10:32:51+00:00

After your arrival in the Netherlands, make sure you get enough fuel to start the bureaucratic battle of the coming days. The most common supermarket in the Netherlands is the Albert Heijn. Once you recognise the blue and white logo, you will find stores everywhere. When in doubt type it into Google Maps.

Other supermarkets are: Plus, Jumbo, Dirk, Spar, Coop, Lidl and Aldi.

Please note that it is NOT POSSIBLE to pay by credit card in the Albert Heijn. Therefore make sure you`ll bring your Maestro Card from home or enough cash with you if you don`t have a Dutch bank account yet.

If you`d rather grab a bite to eat, look for an eetcafe. As Dutch people love their bread for lunch, in an eetcafe you find a nice selection of sandwiches (broodjes) and salads. The places called “restaurant” are mainly for a fancy dinner with friends.

Last resort: order your food online at e.g. Thuisbezorgd.nl or Deliveroo.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Register at the BRP and get a BSN2019-11-02T18:09:42+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands for four months or longer you ought to register at the BRP (Basisregistratie Personen). The BRP is a database which contains personal data of all residents of the Netherlands (as well as from people who have left the Netherlands again). When you register yourself at the BRP, you’ll receive your  Citizen Service Number (burgerservicenummer = BSN) within four weeks after registration (normally!). With the BSN, you can be identified by governmental and non-governmental organisations, which is why you’ll basically need it for all steps ahead (opening a bank account, getting health insurance, register at a GP etc.).

To register at the BRP, you need to make an appointment at your municipality, which in most municipalities you are supposed to do within five days after arriving in the Netherlands.

If you are staying in the Netherlands for less than four months, you need to register nonetheless to get your BSN but are allowed to use your address abroad. Check the webiste of the Dutch Gouvernement on how to register in the Non-residents Records Database.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Make an appointment at the municipality2019-07-13T16:37:33+00:00

To register at the BRP and receive your BSN, you need to make an appointment at your resident municipality in the Netherlands. Most municipalities allow making an appointment online: e.g. AmsterdamDelft, Den Haag, EindhovenGroningen, Nijmegen, Rotterdam, Utrecht.

Normally, you will only receive your BSN if you already have a residential address in the Netherlands. If you already arranged your housing in the Netherlands, you need to bring the following documents to the appointment:

  • Valid travel document (identity card or passport, no driving licence);
  • Residence permit (if applicable);
  • Original documents from abroad (e.g. certificate of birth and marriage, registered partnership or divorce if applicable);
  • Rental contract or contract of sale.

If you did not arrange your housing in the Netherlands yet, there are other possibilities. You are allowed to register with a postal address of your employer or someone you know in the Netherlands. To do so make sure you have written consent from the postal addressee, e.g. the primary occupant of the postal address. The consent needs to include date and place of birth, nationality and the data of the addressee.

If you want to register at the address of your employer or someone you know, you need to bring:

  • Valid travel document (identity card or passport, no driving licence);
  • Residence permit (if applicable);
  • Original documents from abroad (see above);
  • Signed written consent from the postal addressee, e.g. the primary occupant of the postal address. The consent needs to include date and place of birth, nationality and the data of the addressee,
  • and an identity card (or a copy thereof) from the postal addressee.

Read more about this on the website of the Dutch government (website only in Dutch).

Make sure that you register under your permanent address as soon as you signed your rental contract.

Some municipalities accept certified copies of your official documents. However, to be safe, it’s always better to bring the original document if possible. A regular copy won’t be enough!

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Find job vacancies2019-07-13T16:41:13+00:00

If you are looking for work in the Netherlands, you might want to know where to find job vacancies in the Netherlands. First off, if you don’t use LinkedIn yet, consider using it for your job search in the Netherlands. In addition to being your digital CV and “business card”, you’ll also find many attractive vacancies on LinkedIn, especially for non-Dutch speakers. Before diving into the Dutch job market, polish your LinkedIn profile and add some (not too long) descriptions, catchy phrases and most importantly a recent picture of yourself. Having an up-to-date LinkedIn profile is essential to finding work in the Netherlands.

The biggest website for vacancies in the Netherlands is Indeed, which unfortunately is not available in English. However, Indeed offers most vacancies in the Netherlands, because they’re scraping job openings on other websites to offer them on their platform.

Other websites to find work in the Netherlands are:

These are the websites also Dutchies use for their job search. Unfortunately, all the sites above are available in Dutch only. Some of the job descriptions, however, are available in English and in most job specifications you’ll see whether Dutch is required or not.

There are some websites (of job or recruitment agencies) which offer job openings specifically for internationals. See e.g.

Europeanlanguagejobs.com often lists vacancies for non-Dutch speakers in the Netherlands. If you come from France or Sweden, try workwid.fr and workwide.se. For German speakers try Germans abroad and Facebook groups like English speaking vacancies in the Netherlands or Jobs for German speakers in the Netherlands.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Tips for your application2020-02-24T10:32:46+00:00

Finding a job in the Netherlands is not always easy. It might take a while to find work in the Netherlands even though you are highly qualified and possess all the necessary qualifications. Just as with housing in the Netherlands, the most important tip we can give, is not to give up. However, there are more things you can do. Here are some tips for your quest for finding work in the Netherlands.

  • Learn (some) Dutch. Even though this one is the hardest one to achieve, your job chances definitely increase if you speak (some) Dutch. Despite the fact that most expat jobs don’t require you to speak Dutch, many companies feel more comfortable to choose you if you do so. If you live and work in the Netherlands, you will benefit from speaking Dutch, simply because you will get the funny comments your colleagues make at the coffee machine and you will be able to integrate much faster.
  • “Dutchify” your CV. Next to your working experience, in the Netherlands, it is common to put your Date of Birth, place of residence a recent picture and your hobbies and interests in your CV. However, only mention hobbies and activities that actually ad something to your profile, like volunteering experience or sports. In France e.g. it is common to put the Countries you’ve travelled to in your CV, it is not so in the Netherlands.
    ProTip: Mention a Dutch (or international) education which is comparable to your own.
    ProTip for applicants outside of the EU: Mention whether you have a residency and working permit for the Netherlands. Not every company will be able to apply for such.
  • Keep your LinkedIn profile up to date. Make sure recruiters can find you and know that you are available.
  • Work with Job Agencies. In some countries, job agencies don’t have the best reputation; Not so in the Netherlands. Consider working with job agencies like Manpower, Undutchables (for internationals), UniqueRandstad (not available in English) and tempo team (no English website).
  • Choose the dress code for your job application. In most companies, you are not expected to suit up for your job interview (depending on the branches). Go for casual chic.
  • Prepare to be asked direct questions. Dutchies are straightforward, and you will probably also learn that at your job interviews. They try to find out who you are outside of work and might ask questions about your interests, family etc.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Open a Dutch bank account2019-07-13T16:58:31+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands, you will find out that paying with a maestro card as well as cashless payment is very popular. Credit cards are rarely used and are not accepted at the Albert Heijn, which is the biggest supermarket in the Netherlands. At some places, it is not possible anymore to pay cash. For a lot of administration things (like getting a personalized public transport card) you`ll need a bank account. So you might want to think about opening a Dutch bank account.

To open a bank account in the Netherlands, you`ll need:

  • residential address
  • passport and
  • BSN

The most popular banks in the Netherlands are ABN Amro, ING, Rabobank and SNS bank (last two websites are only available in Dutch).

There are a couple of ethical banks, which only invest in green and sustainable projects: Triodos and ASN bank.

ABN Amro allows you to open a Dutch bank account even if you don’t have a BSN yet. You’d need to submit your BSN within a month after opening the bank account though. Furthermore, Bunq allows you to open a Dutch bank account without a BSN. However, Bunq might be a suitable solution if you live in the Netherlands for a shorter period and are not planning on requesting a BSN. They are a little pricier than the regular Dutch banks.

Most Dutch banks offer a student package, which is free of charge for students.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Buy a bike2019-07-13T16:59:59+00:00

For once a cliché is 150% true: the Dutchies bike! And most of them have more than one bike at home. And let’s be honest, it’s just the easiest way to get around if you live in the Netherlands. Therefore, it is about time you get a bike as well. Make sure you buy it second hand since there is a likely chance it will be stolen someday. If you keep your eyes open, there are a lot of bike shops around, where you’ll find bikes between €60 and €100. Go for a test ride and make sure the bike is comfortable, and off you go. Make sure you buy a good lock as well and always try to attach the bike to something like a lamppost if you lock it.

Another possibility is a pretty popular Swap fiets, which are available in most cities in the Netherlands. It works with a monthly subscription. You’ll pay a monthly fee and are guaranteed a bike even when it breaks or gets stolen (own contribution).

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Get a public transport card2019-11-21T18:46:27+00:00

With the OV Chipkaart, you can travel on all public transport in the Netherlands. You top it up with money, check-in and -out for every journey (check-in at the station of your departure and out at your final destination), and off you go. The OV Chipkaart works on trains, busses and even ferries. There are two types of OV Chipkaarts: the anonymous and the personalised one. Purchase the anonymous card at one of the different service points like sales devices at a stations and newsagents and supermarkets or apply for the personalised one online. If you just moved to the Netherlands (especially if you don`t have a bank account yet), the anonymous one will do the trick. However, the personalised OV Chipkaart allows you to book abonnements, etc. on it and might be worth considering it if you live in the Netherlands for a more extended period.

Tip: Since you’ve just moved to the Netherlands, you’d probably like to explore Holland, and therefore the daaluurenabonnement might be recommendable. It costs €50 a year and allows you to travel off-peak (including weekends) with a discount of 40%.

Please note that you need a bank account to get a personalised OV Chipkaart.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Calculate your net to gross income2019-07-13T17:05:08+00:00

In the Netherlands, all tax is automatically deducted from your gross income. The tax rate is generally around 40%, depending on your income. If you work in the Netherlands you might want to calculate your net to gross income especially if you are in the middle of salary negotiations. Use this calculator to calculate your net income based on your gross income. Wages in the Netherlands are usually paid monthly.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Where to get your everyday commodities?2020-03-19T09:15:04+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands, in addition to food, you will likely need a few commodities. Here are some common retailers in the Netherlands:

  • Etos and Kruidvat sell care products and toiletries but also medicine without subscriptions. E.g. for light painkillers or flu medicine in the Netherlands you don’t have to go to the pharmacy but can buy these at Etos or Kruidvat.
  • Hema is a warehouse which sells a lot of basics for your house for a reasonable price. At Hema, you’ll find everything from bedding to kitchen gear and cutlery to (basic) clothing.
  • At Gamma, Praxis, Karwei, Hornbach or Bauhaus you’ll find everything you need for DYO projects like screws and bolts, paints, tools etc.
  • If you are looking for sports clothing or gear, you might find it at Decathlon.
  • Bol.com is one of the biggest online marketplaces in the Netherlands. You’ll find everything from books to clothing to gadgets.

Most websites aren’t available in English. If you don’t want to order online, browse the site for winkels (“stores”) and type in your city or postal code. This will show you the physical stores in your neighbourhood.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Practical apps to find your way2019-12-01T18:22:47+00:00

If you live in the Netherlands, the following websites (also available as apps) will help you get around.

9292.nl lets you plan your travels within the Netherlands. Whether this is from or to an address or a public transport station. It shows you which public transport (incl. ferries and boats) are necessary to get from A to B successfully.

ns.nl is the official website of the Dutch railway. It might be a good idea to quickly check your journey before you take the train. The Dutch railway system is pretty busy, and it happens quite frequently that trains are not running due to disruptions.

buienradar.nl shows you the rain forecast for the upcoming hours. This app is indispensable if you live in the Netherlands! One moment you are sitting on the bike and the rain is pouring down. Five minutes later, the sun is shining again. Unfortunately, the app is only available in the Dutch app store.

Tikkie.me doesn’t exactly help with finding your way in the Netherlands, but can be considered as pretty important while living in the Netherlands. Tikkie is wildly used and allows you to easily ask your money back via WhatsApp or messages. As Duchies usually share bills it is quite common that someone pays the bill at a pub or restaurant and afterwards sends a Tikkie to all participants to get the money back.

Problems finding the apps in your app store? If you own an iPhone, it could be that you need to change the app store.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

First Monday of the month2019-06-15T18:07:16+00:00

Every first Monday of the month, exactly at 12 o’ clock, the sirens go off in the Netherlands. This is a test and no reason to panic.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Medical assistance and emergencies2019-07-13T17:17:28+00:00

We hope your stay in the Netherlands will be emergency free. However, should you need any medical assistance or emergency services while living in the Netherlands you might want to have the most important numbers at hand.

  • For the police, an ambulance or the fire brigade call 112 (emergency number).
  • If you need to reach the police in a non-emergency matter, call 0900-8844.

If you need to see a doctor at the weekend when your GP is closed, you can go to huisartsenpost (not the emergency room!). Just google huisartsenpost, and you will find one close to you.

Here are some useful Dutch words to know:

  • Doctor = Dokter
  • General Practitioner (GP) = Huisarts
  • Hospital = Ziekenhuis
  • Emergency Room = Eerste Hulp
  • Pharmacy = Apotheek
  • Dentist = Tandarts

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Find a place to live2019-06-15T18:09:17+00:00

Finding a room or apartment in the Netherlands can be quite tricky and expensive (depending on the city). Therefore it is recommended you start looking for a place before you arrive in the Netherlands. Shared houses are typical not only for students but also for starters. Be aware you’re competing with many others when looking for a place to live. If possible, arrive weeks in advance so that you will be able to have a look at houses in person. Use your social networks (e.g. numerous Facebook groups) and don’t give up quickly. Manage your expectations and consider temporary solutions as well.

Where to start looking?
Costs of living and budget2019-07-13T17:27:17+00:00

As a young professional or starter working in the Netherlands, you will earn around €1800 net (based on full-time employment) with a yearly extra of approximately one monthly salary paid in May when you get your “holiday money” (vakantiegeld). (Please be aware that this is a reference value and salary might differ per industry). Wages in the Netherlands are usually paid monthly. Check berekenhet.nl to calculate your net income based on your gross salary. Depending on whether you live in the city or somewhere further away (and also which city or region you live) your rent will most likely be somewhere between €500 and €900. For insurance, you will spend around €150 (or €200 if you own a car). Calculate around €250 monthly for groceries and keep in mind travel costs if you commute to work. In the Netherlands, some employers reimburse (part of) the travel costs. Also, think about saving an extra amount for your pension if you want to build up the third pillar. E.g. Bright Pensioen offers an easy to use and starters friendly solution (website available in Dutch only).

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Work and residence permit2019-10-07T11:59:57+00:00

In most cases, a citizen of an EU/EEA country or Switzerland doesn’t need a residence or work permit to stay and work in the Netherlands. A valid passport or national travel ID of your country of origin is evidence enough that you are permitted to stay and work in the Netherlands. You don’t have to report to the Dutch Immigration and Naturalisation Service, and your employer doesn’t need to apply for a work permit for you.

However, make sure you register at your municipality if you plan on living in the Netherlands for more than 90 days.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Check if you are entitled to the 30% facility2019-06-15T18:13:34+00:00

If you come to the Netherlands to work, you might be entitled to the 30% facility. To get 30% facility, you need to be recruited or seconded from a country other than the Netherlands. Furthermore, you need to have specific expertise that is not or is only barely available on the Dutch employment market. This also includes a certain income and degree level (Master’s degree) and your age. Click here for more info about the specific requirements you need to meet.
Moreover, you have to have been living outside of the Netherlands before the 1st working day in the Netherlands as well as more than 150 km away from the Dutch boarder. Please check here for more detailed information about the conditions.

30% facility brings you some attractive financial benefits: your employer may provide you with 30% of your wage, including reimbursement, tax-free. Considering the tax rate in the Netherlands, which is around 40%, the 30% facility can bring you a couple of 100 Euros a month extra.

If you meet the requirements, you need to submit an application together with your employer. Please be aware that it costs money to send the application.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Unsubscribe from services and cancel subscriptions2019-06-15T18:14:14+00:00

Make a list of all memberships, contracts and services you need to unsubscribe from or cancel before you move to the Netherlands. Think about memberships at sports clubs, societies, subscriptions for newspapers and magazines but also contracts for internet, telephone and supply companies like water, gas and electrical supply. Make sure you don’t pay too much and choose the correct cancellation date. If you are leaving the country, usually you don’t have to adhere to the allotted period.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Move your stuff2019-07-13T17:45:58+00:00

A lot of internationals choose to travel light and sell their furniture or store it somewhere in their country of origin. Consider moving with just one suitcase since you might also not know yet where you will be staying and therefore what you need. As international moving services can be quite expensive, try to involve friends and family. If you are a European citizen, it might be a fun road trip to drive to the Netherlands with some of your boxes after you’ve found a place.

If you want to send some luggage from your country of origin to the Netherlands, try websites like sendmybag.com or eurosender.com.

After you’ve arranged your housing in the Netherlands, you might want to furnish your new house. There are multiple websites and Facebook groups where you will be able to find used furniture for a small amount of even for free. Free options are f.e. gratisaftehalen.nl (website in Dutch, type in your location and scroll through the ads) and gratisoptehalen.nl (website in Dutch, type in your postcode and check the section Aangeboden. In the footer of gratisoptehalen.nl you’ll also find Facebook groups per region). Also check marktplaats.nl, which is the Netherlands’ biggest marketplace for used things and search on Facebook for groups in your region.

Was this post useful to you? Feel free to share this information with those who might find it beneficial. Here’ s the link to this item.

Looking for a job in the Netherlands?